A Blue Moon

image
Sunset – River of Lava

This weekend we have had a lovely time camping in Devon.

It was a last minute thing and we loved it. Especially for children, the campsite had a lovely play park and a large field to fly kites and run around.  Even though mum let go of the kite and had to rescue it from the farmer’s field next door – Kam didn’t though.

We went on the beach during the daytime and in the evening cooked dinner by the tent. Kam thoroughly enjoyed himself.
It did rain, the tent leaked a bit, but the sun did shine.  The sunset was glorious – it looked like a river of lava.  Luckily the rain did stop, the clouds disappeared and the most magnificent Moon appeared, it was huge and so bright it lit up the campsite.
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Visible Planets June 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Planets

For us, this is a useful post.  We wrote about the visible planets in April and May.  It gives us the basics in one place, which kind of helps!  We’ve got our own Jupiter photo below. x

The post tells us something about Mars, Jupiter and Saturn – simply a recap. It reminds us where the planets are in the sky, theoretically!

Here are the links for July: Visible Planets July 2015 – Mercury and Venus and Visible Planets July 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Mars

Mars
Mars

Mars has a red hue to it because iron oxides (rust) covers its surface.

Most of the time, Mars glows dimly in the night sky, except when it is directly opposite the Sun, (opposition).

When Mars is in opposition, usually every 2 years, it’s at its largest and brightest.

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Visible Planets June 2015 – Mercury and Venus

PlanetsIn April and May, we wrote about which planets we would be able to see in the sky.  This is June’s post and I hope we get to use it.  It has been a useful post and we even took our own Jupiter photo in May!

Here is our post about the visible planets: Visible Planets.

Here are the links for July: Visible Planets July 2015 – Mercury and Venus and Visible Planets July 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Mercury

Mercury
Mercury

Mercury’s colour is yellowish, orange or pinkish.  Its hue comes from the sunrise or sunset sky colours.  It is a pinpoint of light, almost star like.

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Visible Planets May 2015 – Mercury and Venus

PlanetsIn April, we wrote about which planets we would be able to see in the sky.  This is May’s post and I hope we get to use it.  It has been a useful post and we even took our own Jupiter photo. (It is in the link given below, but is not a NASA masterpiece!

These are the links for those posts:

Visible Planets and Visible Planets May 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Here are the links for July: Visible Planets July 2015 – Mercury and Venus and Visible Planets July 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Mercury

Mercury
Mercury

Mercury’s colour is yellowish, orange or pinkish.  Its hue comes from the sunrise or sunset sky colours.  It is a pinpoint of light, almost star like.

Continue reading

Visible Planets May 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

For us, this is a useful post.  We wrote about the visible planets in April, here is the May version.  It gives us the basics in one place, which kind of helps!

We’ve got our own Jupiter photo below. x The post tells us something about Mars, Jupiter and Saturn – simply a recap. It reminds us where the planets are in the sky, theoretically!

Here are the links for July:

Visible Planets July 2015 – Mercury and Venus and 
Visible Planets July 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Mars

Mars
Mars

Mars has a red hue to it because iron oxides (rust) covers its surface. Most of the time, Mars glows dimly in the night sky, except when it is directly opposite the Sun, (opposition). When Mars is in opposition, usually every 2 years, it’s at its largest and brightest. Continue reading

Visible Planets

One evening  a few weeks ago – more than a few now, Kam pointed to the sky.  I didn’t know what we were looking at.  Look to the left of the moon mum, there’s a planet.

Oh ok, how do you know that?  Mum, because it’s big, it’s bright, it’s not so sparkly, like you and grandad tell me. Oh, ok.

So, being the expert, I look on the iPad.  Sure enough I scan the area, and oh my, it’s a planet.  It’s Jupiter.  Oh golly gosh.

Visible Planets

Jupiter and Earth's Moon
Jupiter and Earth’s  moon:NASA

Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn are the brightest planets in the sky.

We can see them with our eyes, indeed they are known as the Naked Eye Planets.  Of course, you must know where and what to look for – pretty amazing we think.
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What is g-force?

A question about g-force. Why?

Atlantis Shuttle Launch:ISS
Atlantis Shuttle Launch:ISS

Simply because Kam’s wetsuit has g-force written across the front of it.  Here is a conversation between Kam and the swimming pool lifeguard.
“hello g-force”
“Hello, why do you call me g-force, my name is Kam”.
“Oh, but g-force is a great name, it’s a super power”.

Oh my, that’s it. Kam, the super powered 4 year old swimmer. (He can swim, he’s competent, and learning his strokes.)

Kam presses his super power button – “Turn on the g-force super power, catch me if you can”.
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What is Gravity?

Kam’s question about g force has led me to write about gravity first. The g force post will be our next post.

What is Gravity?

Gravity
Gravity is a force, here attracting or pulling objects to Earth

Gravity is the force that keeps us on Earth’s surface.

  • Without the force of gravity, we would fall off and float away from beloved planet Earth, with it we are safely grounded.
  • When you throw a ball in the air, gravity makes it fall back to Earth, then you can catch it.
  • Some objects, like the Earth and the Sun, have more gravity than others.
  • Tides are caused by the rotation of the Earth and the gravitational effects of the Moon and Sun.
  • Life on Earth could not exist without gravity.

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Why do we See One Side of the Moon?

Phasa of the moon
Moon Phases during a Lunar Cycle

“Why do we see one side of the moon?  Does the moon turn round, because I always see the same patterns?”  Kam asked me these questions whilst we were looking at the included image showing different phases of the moon.

I don’t know if these are questions that small children ask.  I don’t remember asking these sorts of questions.

I’m not sure that it would have occurred to me to think that the moon has different patterns.

To me, the moon was the moon.  I do remember looking at the stars, but perhaps I accepted information without being as inquisitive.
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If the Sun is a star, why is it so Big?

The Sun imaged by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope: NASA
The Sun imaged by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope: NASA

“Mummmmm”,”yes”. “I have a question”.  “Go on then, tell me about it”.  “Brian Cox says the sun is a star, why is it bigger than other stars?”  “Because it is” is not a viable option.

Before I started to look for an answer I became sidetracked reading about Professor Brian Cox.  One of his inspirer’s had been Carl Sagan.  So, I thought who is Carl Sagan.
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