Visible Planets August 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Planets

Planet spotting in July was non-existent for us.  We’ve had long evenings and planets out of view.  We did see a Blue Moon on July 30th which was pretty amazing.  We were camping in Devon and when the clouds cleared we saw the most beautiful Moon, then found out it was a Blue Moon.

Blue Moon, Devon U.K. - July 31 2015.
Blue Moon, Devon U.K. – July 31 2015.

Our visible planet notes are as much about learning a little bit about the them as watching out for them.  We hope you find them useful.

Here are links to our other visible planet posts:
Visible Planets September 2015 – Mercury and Venus
Visible Planets August 2015 – Mercury and Venus
Visible Planets

Or our planet poems:
Planet Venus or Planet Mercury

Mars

Mars: NASA
Mars:NASA

Mars has a red hue to it because iron oxides (rust) covers its surface.

Most of the time, Mars glows dimly in the night sky, except hen it is directly opposite the Sun, (opposition).  Mars is in opposition every two years.

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and is the second smallest in our solar system.

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Visible Planets July 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Planets

For us, the visible planets have been tough to follow throughout June.  It gets dark so much later.  which on one hand is great, more park time, but definitely not great for Kam’s planet spotting, past his bedtime I’m afraid.

We’ve revamped our planet information, so it’s fresh, as we’ve had a tendency to skip over it.  We hope you find it useful.

Here are links to our other visible planet posts:
Visible Planets July 2015 – Mercury and Venus
Visible Planets

Mars

Mars
Mars

Mars has a red hue to it because iron oxides (rust) covers its surface.

Most of the time, Mars glows dimly in the night sky, except when it is directly opposite the Sun, (opposition).  Mars is in opposition every two years.

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and is the second smallest in our solar system.

Continue reading

Visible Planets June 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Planets

For us, this is a useful post.  We wrote about the visible planets in April and May.  It gives us the basics in one place, which kind of helps!  We’ve got our own Jupiter photo below. x

The post tells us something about Mars, Jupiter and Saturn – simply a recap. It reminds us where the planets are in the sky, theoretically!

Here are the links for July: Visible Planets July 2015 – Mercury and Venus and Visible Planets July 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Mars

Mars
Mars

Mars has a red hue to it because iron oxides (rust) covers its surface.

Most of the time, Mars glows dimly in the night sky, except when it is directly opposite the Sun, (opposition).

When Mars is in opposition, usually every 2 years, it’s at its largest and brightest.

Continue reading

Visible Planets May 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

For us, this is a useful post.  We wrote about the visible planets in April, here is the May version.  It gives us the basics in one place, which kind of helps!

We’ve got our own Jupiter photo below. x The post tells us something about Mars, Jupiter and Saturn – simply a recap. It reminds us where the planets are in the sky, theoretically!

Here are the links for July:

Visible Planets July 2015 – Mercury and Venus and 
Visible Planets July 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Mars

Mars
Mars

Mars has a red hue to it because iron oxides (rust) covers its surface. Most of the time, Mars glows dimly in the night sky, except when it is directly opposite the Sun, (opposition). When Mars is in opposition, usually every 2 years, it’s at its largest and brightest. Continue reading

Visible Planets April 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Planets

This is the link for newer posts: 

Visible Planets May 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn
Visible Planets June 2015 – Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

I have decided to repost these posts as Kam has asked where and why planets move across the sky and sometimes disappear.

Following on from our other visible planets posts we need to find out where we can see Mars, Jupiter and Saturn in the sky.

Mars

Mars
Mars

Mars has a red hue to it because iron oxides (rust) covers its surface.

Mars glows dimly in the night sky most of the time, except when it is directly opposite the Sun, (opposition).

When Mars is in opposition, usually every 2 years, it’s at its largest and brightest.

Generally though, Mars is not as bright as Venus but it’s luminosity is largest as its orbit get closer to Earth. (Its elliptical orbit means that it can vary from 50 to 400 million km from Earth.)
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